Private Cooking Classes

by Louisa on June 22, 2012

Oh my gosh, it’s still hot as heck out! I’m glad I’ve been inside all week teaching classes.

Yesterday at the Institute for Culinary Education, we tried out a bunch of vegetarian recipes from my upcoming Persian cookbook, including Tomato and Cucumber Salad with Lime Juice, Rice with Dill, Fava Beans, & Potato Tahdig, and Tempeh Kebabs with Lime-Herb Marinade.

The amazing students worked hard to pull off our feast, fighting the humidity to roll warm dough into shapely cookies, and standing over a pizzelle iron so we could enjoy pizzelle ice cream sandwiches filled with cool, creamy saffron frozen yogurt.

Tomorrow I’ll be back in my apron with a sweet group of friends who I’ve taught before at the Brooklyn Kitchen. For this private party, we’ll be making Roasted Artichokes Stuffed with Ricotta, Braised Chicken with Turmeric and Lime, and a gorgeous salad of greens topped with radishes, rhubarb, and strawberries!

I love teaching people about fresh, seasonal cooking, and using vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and spices to make healthy food that sings. Come join me at one of my classes this summer, or throw a class with a bunch of your pals that focuses on exactly what you would like to learn. If your kitchen is small, I can teach your group at one of the city’s many cooking schools or kitchen spaces available to rent. If you have a big kitchen, let’s do it at your place!

If you’d like to plan a class, get in touch with me at email hidden; JavaScript is required.

I leave you with some thoughts on compromising in the kitchen. This is a post I wrote for rachaelray.com about adjusting to eating as a married woman….Big thanks to my aunt, Carol Gillott of Paris Breakfast, for all of the photos from yesterday’s cooking class, and to family friend David Boyer for the fab wedding cake photo!

 

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

parisbreakfast June 22, 2012 at 11:39

Great class yesterday!
The tempeh kebobs were unreal!
I made the Sharazi salad this morning – perfect for this hot weather.
Tanks

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Sara June 27, 2012 at 11:20

Found from Paris breakfasts.
I love Persian food above all others. I lived in Iran in the 70s. I adore the culture and the people. I even had a Persian step mother for a while. I’m interested in your classes.
Also where do you buy Persian ingredients?

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Louisa June 27, 2012 at 18:08

Hi Sara,

You’re so lucky to have lived in Iran! I would love to go. I just finished a wonderful and insightful book about Iran called Mirrors of the Unseen, by Jason Elliot.

I’d be happy to talk with you about setting up a class. Please email me at info at lucidfood dot com, and we can talk about what you’d like to learn.

I buy Persian ingredients here in NYC at the famous Kalustyan’s on Lexington btw 28/29. For online ordering, check out Sadaf, Super Hormuz, and Kalamala.

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Kim June 27, 2012 at 14:30

Carol sent me over to see what you are up to here. It sounds as though you are quite busy and your food looks fabulous. As a very close to vegan (sometimes I have a bit of fish) eater, I am always looking for inspiring veg recipes! Your photos looks fabulous! I also love the “Carol drawings” you have featured here. This is a beautiful blog!

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Louisa June 27, 2012 at 17:47

Hi Kim,

Thanks! The span of vegetarian food options is huge. Just take your favorite world cuisine and take the meat out! The wonderful exotic seasonings that we used in class, like cardamom, sumac, and pomegranate syrup can just as easily be used with veggies, beans, etc. Lovely artwork on your site, by the way!

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Jerri-Ann June 28, 2012 at 09:22

Louisa, Persian food is one of my favorites! You can be sure I am looking forward to buying your new book as soon as it is available! I have enjoyed every recipe I have tried from Lucid Food cookbook! I need to thank your Taunte Carol for introducing me to your great food blog,too.

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Louisa June 28, 2012 at 14:11

Hi Jerri-Ann, I’m so happy to hear that! Yep, Taunte Carol is my fairy godmother on the web, always looking out for me!

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Klara Kovic June 28, 2012 at 10:50

Hello:
I simply adore your food. Leaving in Madrid, Spain, one of my favourite spots is a nice persian restaurant named Teheran runned by a persian couple which is not far away from home. I’d love to attend one of your classesone day but I live,ehem, a bit far from New York. However I have your first book and look very much forward to reading the new one. I love all kinds of different foods: being half croatian, half spaniard nad having lived in Thailand, Germany, London, Perú and the South of France, let me tell you, I enjoy eating. Congratulations for a great, great job!!!!

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Louisa June 28, 2012 at 14:23

Hola Klara,

Qué tal? Gracias para visitarme. If I’m ever back in Madrid I’d love to check out your Persian haunt. I want to travel as much as you seem to! Péru is definitely on my list of destinations, for the food as well as the culture. I’m really happy to hear that you enjoy Lucid Food, and it’s awesome to know that someone in Spain has my cookbook. Suerte con todo.

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Leo December 1, 2012 at 21:53

I visit GP frequently and am smaowhet acquainted with Will Allen. I have had only positive feelings about what they are doing. Reading the links provided by Bunny leaves me confused and uneasy. Is there any oversight going on with GP? I can’t argue with Michelle’s well-argued position, and it saddens me that GP has taken this step. I think that if they were well-managed, they could carry on without corporate money. It reminds me of how corporations slowly bought up small food companies and created Big Organic .I’m sticking with my own garden (city lot), backyard hens and food preservation. I grow winter greens in buckets in the basement with a grow lite and give my hens a rest by NOT leaving a light on in the winter. I use the last of the eggs laid in the fall sparingly and make do until they start again in the early spring. Unless I know a farmer personally, I am wary. Some of the produce a friend bought at a Farmer’s Market rotted within two days must have been from one or two or more weeks ago market. GP told me they dispose of their hens after two years or less not my idea of humane treatment. GP’s tiny (plastic clamshell) packages of sprouts and greens sell for $3.99 at the local coop pretty pricy even though I have to say they pack quite a lot of greens into the container.Anyway, I find this news disturbing. One more noble effort down the drain of corporate contamination.

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